Great post, I also liked your one on starting a fashion blog. Do you have a post on affiliate linking through social media? I’m pretty confused on whats acceptable, especially for Pinterest. It seems Shopstyle {Shopsense} and rewardStyle seem to work on Pinterest. I started my website on Weebly.. so I am making the oh-not-so-fun transition over to WordPress currently.
I think content marketing is absolutely huge for affiliate’s, especially going into 2016, I think it will increasingly become something that will have to be adopted to gain domain trust, authority and good SERP rankings. Google loves quality content and if you want your website to stand the test of time, white-hat SEO is a must and content marketing is king!
Perhaps my dry humor blurs my message, but I don’t consider myself to be burned out. I think that would be an insult to everyone working more hours than me with perhaps less pay. Not to mention those in actual physically demanding jobs. I have extra energy to burn and am making moves to explore working in the banking side of things. Acquisition and merger activity is expected to pick up with smaller oil companies struggling.
Affluence and economic standing within society are often expressed in terms of percentile ranking. Economic ranking is conducted either in terms of giving lower thresholds for a designated group (e.g. the top 5%, 10%, 15%, etc.) or in terms of the percentage of households/individuals with incomes above a certain threshold (e.g. above $75,000, $100,000, $150,000, etc.). The table below presents 2006 income data in terms of the lower thresholds for the given percentages (e.g. the top 25.6% of households had incomes exceeding $80,000, compared to $47,000 for the top quarter of individuals).[7][13]

As you progress your mid-career 6-figure/+ salary, and full 401K contributions over the years, along other bonuses/stocks/investments you may have made/saved., you are on your path to that million and/or FI.. As you reach into late 30s, early 40s, see the financial picture: your 401K+investments growing about 7% average — on a typical 800K investments — that amount to $56K/year, your salary (don’t forget savings!), plus say 25K/year growth on your home-equity (in good town/school-district)., you will be closing “double” the six-figure income. Keep the progress going, cruise-control, and enjoy the ride along the way — you be on your way to FI soon. Do learn Golf, you know how to hob-nob with big boys (or girls)
Hi i posted on here before but I have a quick question! My parents both work at Jp Morgan as I did before and make well well over 100k each but they didn’t go to the best colleges and one didn’t even go to college. So I believe it’s more ambition in yourself then what college or prestigious college you attend. Would you agree with my statement because I choose a cheaper instate school because I have belief in myself to do good not the school. Does this make sense or am I just setting myself up for failure?
I’m always surprised by how many people feel “icky” about promoting affiliate products – I started my blogging “career” building niche blogs specifically to sell Amazon products, then branched out into other affiliate programs. I’m a big fan of affiliate marketing, provided that the blogger/marketer is also providing quality content with their links.

* My closely-guarded, multi-million dollar launch strategy which has hundreds of affiliates begging you to promote. (I have this down. My biggest launch, back in 2008, did $1.9M in a week. Every one of my past 7 launches has got #1 Bestseller and Product of the Day status on JVZoo and I have multiple products in the Top 50 products of all-time on JVZoo).
I definitely agree on taking as many AP classes and college classes as possible. I did 13 APs in HS and 2 college classes. My only regret is I didn’t take fewer AP and more college classes. An AP class takes 1 full year and an exam you have to pay for at the end of the year. The college class takes 1 semester and usually the school district pays for it… and the classes are usually a lot easier than an AP exam.
I saw that and sort of snorted at the similarity between that and working in the arts and then laughed out loud when you wrote “we’re not artists, for Pete’s sake.” I have no idea why people think that noble or creative jobs are a reward in themselves. We all still have the same base expenses in life. If you’re working 40 hours a week in a job that provides any sort of value, you should be able to cover them.
Thanks for visiting. I recommend tracking your finances for two weeks and writing down everything you’ve spent money on. Then purge the unnecessary things and all that money into another savings account you can’t touch, or auto invest it in a digital wealth advisor like Wealthfront. The key is to cut fat and automate your savings and contributions. Do this for 10 years and you WILL have more money than you could ever realistically imagine.

As I run a blogging blog, which is a niche where finding a right affiliate product is tough as well. Till now I have written just one “ultimate article” and I’m still struggling to get it ranked. I’m just about to send an email to YOU or to Glen to get feedback for that “ultimate article” of mine, and appreciate you guys help me with that, just like Glen helped Slavko.


Wealthy Affiliate has a fantastic training program and a super-supportive community. Help is accessible 24/7/365, and not just any help, but from the very top! The founders themselves are closely involved in creating the training, giving advice, being there to guide you through things that might be unclear to a newbie. Having had first-hand experience with the Wealthy Affiliates platform, I would too, recommend them to anyone seeking to start their own online business.
The Six Figure Mentors have a tiered membership training program that takes you from totoal digital newbie to empowered online entrepreneur. They offer various training packages that cater to different stages of your personal/professional development. Pricing starts from $197 for the basic membership package but goes all the way up to $20,000 for the top level training they offer.
Location is a big factor. As you know, six figures in SF is not six figures in the Midwest. Income is very relative depending on the local cost of living. I have many family members and friends who are teachers (all in the Midwest) and none are close to six figures nor aspire to have such income unless they have outside hustles. When I was entering college 30 years ago, I considered teaching until I saw the salaries and how they plateaued. I was too money motivated and pursued a different path. Now I am in my late 40s and winding down my work schedule and considering becoming a part-time business teacher at a local college and/or private HS since money is no longer my motivation. I would like to see more entrepreneurial education opportunities for teens.
Most of the information on this site is free for you to read, watch or listen to, but The Creative Penn is also a business and my livelihood. So please expect hyperlinks to be affiliate links in many cases, when I receive a small percentage of sales if you wish to purchase. I only recommend tools, books and services that I either use or people I know personally. Integrity and authenticity continue to be of the highest importance to me. Read the privacy policy here. I hope you find the site useful! Thanks - Joanna
Im 39 yrs old, graduated from a average college in business management. I currently work for the state in the IT help desk making around 35k a year in Sacramento, Im not happy with this salary, but my job is stable and Ihave retirement benefits. But, I want to make more money now, I want to be making 250k plus, I dont know if I should quit this job and go to the private sector and what field I should go into or stay what in the same field but switch to private IT job. I feel at this age, If I went back to business school to get an MBA might be a waste of time and money. Can you advise me?
Author Bio: Sam started Financial Samurai in 2009 to help people achieve financial freedom sooner, rather than later. He spent 13 years working in investment banking, earned his MBA from UC Berkeley, and retired at age 34 in San Francisco. Everything Sam writes is based on first-hand experience because money is too important to be left up to pontification.
Oddly enough, here I am building up this one site with recommended products and WAS going to find a picture of Michael Cheney and somehow I ran right into this article at the top of Google. Even though it gave me chills to read it, “oh, maaaan, there probably went $2k out the window” because what you said rang so true, I had to take the journalist’s point of view and pull it back around to some other things I realized instantly.
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