The principle job of a reservoir engineer is to predict how much oil is in the ground and how quickly these volumes can be recovered. This involves working with geologists and other engineers to build computer models to forecast production. The unique thing about this industry is the uncertainty of it all. I’ve been on a team where all the engineers, assurers, managers propose a project…get the company to spend a billion dollars…and end in complete disaster. So a considerable amount of hand-waving is involved.
I make six figures and have for a long time. It is nice but in retrospect not as important as I once thought. It is simply a number. I admire you for following your passion. Unfortunately income and passion often intersect and you need to choose one or the other. I think we all try to straddle that path for a while but eventually it seems that we often have to choose.
Yes, its possible. If you go in as a tech (for example GS-05), however, you will be stuck there forever regardless of performance (consecutive exemplary ratings here), schooling (Bachelors 3.5 & Masters 3.9), a voluntary war zone deployment, or wherever. Go in as a internship with scheduled grade increases (for example GS07 to 09 to 11 to 12) increasing every year or so.

Look around the blogosphere; law school grads are taking perma-part time jobs, MBA’s are a dime a dozen, and on and on. As long as the population keeps climbing uncontrollably in the US, and as long as businesses can manipulate the government into helping them keep downward pressure on jobs through slimy programs like H1B’s, big salaries will be a thing of the past. It’s why you should think *really* hard about going to college. It’s not for everyone, and its no guarantee that you’ll do better than if you don’t. The old fable of going to college means you’ll make $1m more in your lifetime than if you don’t, has been disproved time and again.
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I’d like to present another alternative to engineering, for those who don’t find that appealing: become an airline pilot. The major airlines are facing a tremendous shortage of pilots in the coming decade and for most that is due to the huge looming wave of mandatory retirements. That means not only will there be incredible demand for new pilots, but those who get hired in the next few years will move up the seniority lists very fast and enjoy the commensurate benefits of seniority (higher pay, more days off, more vacation, etc) far sooner than those of us who entered the industry twenty years ago. And life at a major airline can be pretty good. Nearly every major airline captain these days is making north of $200k, and some of the more senior bring in closer to $300k. And that is without a requirement for an advanced degree; a four-year degree from any accredited institution gets you in the door.


I’ve seen college programs where they tell kids to “slow down” and take fewer credits to “ease in” to school and be successful. (My most recent job was college professor!) SURE – fewer credits, more years of college and a crapload more money for the school and debt for the student. There’s a difference between part-time (living at home, working, etc.) and slowing down (living on campus, taking at least 5-6 years to finish a degree).
Interesting post. I made about 110k at age 25 working less than 40 hrs and about 4 weeks off. It was my first gig and a non engineering degree. I graduated with a Masters and now make much more simply because i work more hrs. Im in the healthcare field. Job is tolerable and hrs are flexible with a high level of freedom and flexibility. My path was different from most as i fell into the profession, rather than having a concrete plan. I am blessed I suppose. I have a friend who gruduated with a Chemical Engineering degree and has not worked in the field since graduating from a reputable Uni about 4 yrs ago. Last we spoke, he was working night shift at Dunkin Donuts. He tells me he cant find any work in the field. Whats up with that? He is in NYC.
As I read further to post this, I saw a next post about marrying for money. How dare…..I know it happens. I did it. After a 7 year extremely abusive marriage, which ended in debt over my head and my children still get to see this abuser and still has more time than should be allowed, due to a horrid system, with his perfect on paper persona, Works for the DOD, contractor, writing programs and coding for them, white collar perfect portrayal of family, to only be a devil in his own home behind closed doors…..
Set your price. Usually, websites sell for 3-5 times the yearly revenue. So if you had a blog for six months that made $30,000 in those six months, your yearly revenue would be about $60,000. You could then sell your site for $180,000 or more depending on your buyer. Bigger companies are most likely to spend larger amounts of money on a website than small companies are.
Hello I just stumbled across your blog. A bit of back ground. I garudated with a degree in accounting in 2008. I got a job at a small firm, but got fired 3months in. I tried my best but I wasn’t getting it and no one was helping me learn. I went back to school did a year of sciences and tried to come back to accounting. I didn’t get another job till 2011 and got fired 11 months in. I learned and applied myself but I also felt I just wasn’t wanted despite my best effort. Tried to get back into it to get my CPA but could not find a job. I found many recruiters to be rude and condescending. A bit more info on me I was a bit of a hot head in college and took shit from no one. I managed to make a lot of enemies very few friends. I feel this is another reason I can’t get work in my home town I just have a bad reputation, and my resume does not look good. I am now almost 30. I want to support my family but and I feel I need to go back and find a useful skill to do so. I was thinking about doing a two year engineering diploma in the energy field; doing IT + accounting; or going into nursing. Any advice would be very much appreciated. Thank you for hearing me out.
Thanks for the tips, Tiffany! It was very helpful. I just started my blog about a month ago and just signed up for Shareasale. I do have a further question. Do you know what blog post on Shareasale’s blog, gives me the best information in getting started and what I need to do? I am finding it hard to navigate my way through and really get an idea of the best way to start. It’s all quite overwhelming. Or is there a post that you have to guide me better?
Things to note – in senior year I applied my scholarship to do my first year of my MBA in finance at my university. At 23 I bought an apartment complex which gives 10%+ ROI. At graduation in December I’m eyeing to be pulling 140k before my 24th bday. So that’s been my journey. To a high net worth ~130-140k + a ~ 140k income at 23. My issue is I’ll have a NW still around 140k at 24 (because I’m living it up this 1 semester woot woot and not saving much for 4 months). So I’m troubled figuring out how I can turn 140k + my high income to 1 million before 28 to keep pace with Sam. When school finishes I plan to buy more apartment complex’s continue to buy index funds, save over 95% still and get back to working on a project and finance site as I’ll have more free time with engineering school over finally. Still with that, I’m not sure how to make 860k in 4 years… thinking I’ll have to go to finance or consulting and pray for big bonuses to make it happen because otherwise I’m not sure how to keep up with Sam :) any ideas people?

Nearly $5,000 in affiliate sales is awesome, and I see this as a turning point for bringing in a respectable income from the site. (I’ve written more in this post about how we’re monetizing The Write Life.) But before we dive into how we accomplished this, I want to put that income in perspective for you. It’s still a drop in the bucket for our company, for three reasons:
An aspect I enjoy from the job is when the team you’re working on all comes together to present a final story. Each person (geologists, other engineers, economics) has their part and supports each other. Being a global industry, I’ve also enjoyed meeting people from all parts of the world. I’ve been able to travel about 8 times internationally..another perk (depending on the person) I did not really touch on.

Anyway, back to this program called the Seven Figure Franchise. There have been many affiliate programs that have come and gone over the years promising all sorts of wealth and prosparity. Now don’t get me wrong, I do believe that people make money with affiliate marketing, but like some of the people her have mentioned, you have to do it in the right way.
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