I’m going into a Top 10 school (Duke), but am unsure of what to major in other than something math/science/engineering related–I’m fortunate enough to enjoy all technical fields. I initially considered Biomedical Engineering, since it’s Duke’s strong suit, but it seems like quite the gamble; electrical/computer engineering or computer science seems a far safer route.
As I run a blogging blog, which is a niche where finding a right affiliate product is tough as well. Till now I have written just one “ultimate article” and I’m still struggling to get it ranked. I’m just about to send an email to YOU or to Glen to get feedback for that “ultimate article” of mine, and appreciate you guys help me with that, just like Glen helped Slavko.
My parents had never went to college. When I applied to school, it was mostly based on schools that received my SAT scores and followed up with advertisement. A lot of those schools are private liberal arts colleges. I went to the one that cost the least in terms of loans. Sometimes I wonder if I’d applied to Yale, Harvard or MIT if I would have gotten in. It’s more a curiosity at this point.
If you are blogging to make money and haven't read this book, you are in for a treat! Co-authors Darren Rowse and Chris Garrett lay out all of the details that the aspiring blogger needs in order to begin earning money at blogging. The book also pulls no punches in telling the readers how much work they will have to put in and how remarkable their blogs really must be to draw advertising dollars. Professional blogging is indeed full-time work, make no mistake. Darren and Chris have created in this manual a detailed roadmap for new and experienced bloggers alike who might have unique idea for a blog and enough passion and material about the topic for the long haul. I've got a blog and now I have a million new ideas about how to make the blog more "can't live without it" for my current subscribers and how to reel in more new readers. The book is an easy and enjoyable read. I read the entire thing in one cross-country flight. The sections of their book that I found most useful were the chapters on income and earning strategies, how to write a blog, blogging for a niche, blog networks, blog promotion and marketing, and the secrets of successful blogging. If you're a blogger, this is a book you shouldn't be without. The authors make all of their income from blogging and this book brightly lights the way for the anyone who aspires to be a pro blogger.
Learning and reading and trying things is fundamental to success. Anyone can do anything if they truly put their mind to it. This is not a get rich quick scheme, this is an idea board and an educational blog for people to explore, learn and try innovative ways to make money and retire early. It does take money to make money, but driving Uber for a couple of months until you have $3,000 to either invest or apply towards your startup won’t kill you. Yes, you may work 60+ hours for a short time, but it’s a short term time investment to a long term monetary payoff.
I don’t have firsthand data but I believe you’d earn a similar amount working in investment banking as in Pet E for the first few years. However, you’d probably work up to twice the hours (60-80+ per week). If you do well and stay in the industry you could make an extremely high income…much more potential. Might have to go to a prestigious school and be at the top of your class however.

– Don’t get stuck in a rut. Meaning, if a job or opportunity has no more learning potential then get out and get a different orange to squeeze. Until your late 20’s or early 30’s, consider education, experience and opportunities the #1 form of payment. An environment that allows questioning the workings of an industry and one’s company with answers from higher up is a gold mine.


I just want to point out that all though it is fantastic to go to college & to have great grades, innovative thinking & motivation can land you an awesome job. I graduated HS top of my class & went to a small private college for 2 years. I only have an AA degree (nothing to brag about though I always earned As). I decided to get married at 19 (I know, right?!) but when I was staying at home with the kids, I started my own real estate business & started making a 6 figure income within 3 years. I have doubled that within the past year & rake in over $300K per year working from home. I sell around 200 properties a year. I just hit 30 & make over $300K per year & started making 6 figures at only 28. I’m sitting pretty with a high paying job where I am in control of my own destiny. Work ethic & seeing an opportunity & knowing how to seize it is how I got there. With that said, I do value education & will likely go back to get a degree someday just so I can say I have one. For now though, I will focus on my $300K+ per year income & know that I made this for myself.

Is it possible to be financially saavy while still having an eye to a larger picture? i.e. How the choice of career or industry can affect the planet and our descendants? What good is it to have a six figure income if, in it’s application, the planet is not habitable for our grandchildren, or the purchase and consumption results in a feudal state of massive inequality? Have you noticed there is only one winner in a game of Monopoly, the rest are left bereft.
I’d like to present another alternative to engineering, for those who don’t find that appealing: become an airline pilot. The major airlines are facing a tremendous shortage of pilots in the coming decade and for most that is due to the huge looming wave of mandatory retirements. That means not only will there be incredible demand for new pilots, but those who get hired in the next few years will move up the seniority lists very fast and enjoy the commensurate benefits of seniority (higher pay, more days off, more vacation, etc) far sooner than those of us who entered the industry twenty years ago. And life at a major airline can be pretty good. Nearly every major airline captain these days is making north of $200k, and some of the more senior bring in closer to $300k. And that is without a requirement for an advanced degree; a four-year degree from any accredited institution gets you in the door.
If you work for a major (Shell, Chevron, BP, Conoco) they pay about 90 – 100k starting for petroleum engineers and about 70-80k for mechanical/chemical/electrical engineers. The exception is Exxon (they pay more because it’s a terrible work environment, but they make the most profits). If you work for a smaller independent, perhaps it gets bumped up 10k or so. Bonuses are typically 10-20%. I’m a recent graduate in Petroleum Engineering working for Shell.
Wealthy Affiliate has a fantastic training program and a super-supportive community. Help is accessible 24/7/365, and not just any help, but from the very top! The founders themselves are closely involved in creating the training, giving advice, being there to guide you through things that might be unclear to a newbie. Having had first-hand experience with the Wealthy Affiliates platform, I would too, recommend them to anyone seeking to start their own online business.
If you are writing online your posts should be brief, clear, checked for spelling and grammar and consistent. Your blog may not have broad appeal if it has limitations in these, so your EBooks and public posts can benefit from a professional proof-reader, or extra classes in English, whether it is your first language or not. Whether you write a blog, a book or anything else, your only tool to deliver your message is language, and you should gain all the skills you can with it. If you don’t have time for this, use the services of someone with the best language skills you can find.
Thank you for your comment, but I don’t think I felt the need to comment if your post was about “six figures can be achieved in a variety of industries if one is the top of their field”. Don’t we all know that? College prof, photographers, athletes, actors, dancers, musicians, designers, personal trainers etc. You wouldn’t list these as $100k+ industries, do you? I wrote my last comment to explain that symphony orchestra industry also does not fit into the “industries that often pay six figures within 3 years out of school”.
You found a topic that is of interest to a huge target audience (who doesn’t want to make 100k plus a year?) You spent some money so your website comes up while searching google (therefore generating more traffic to your page) and you’ve written this guide in a way that includes everyone (that way nobody feels like they aren’t able to achieve this same success) Throughout the article you’ve posted links to multiple products/companies which you earn revenue from each time someone clicks them. Along with that there are advertisements throughout that you’re gaining revenue on etc. So essentially, anyone reading this and clicking links is generating revenue for you. Touché
If you lack the time to read the details of the review, here’s the short version: Michael Cheney’s Commission Black Ops isn’t as the sales page claims. Your chances of making $1000 per day with it are very slim. You’ll discover that there’s really nothing exceptionally revealing or new about it. Some of the information in it are actually stuff you can get for free on the Internet. I provided proof for all these within the main body of the review below.

You should still shoot to be in the top 5% of your class. Pure determination alone can get you into the top 10%, and that’s likely going to get you a spot in a public university. For example, students in Texas are guaranteed admission into any public university in the state if they are within the top 7% of their class (formerly 10%). There’s a similar program at Georgia. Check if your state schools have similar guaranteed admission criteria.


Of course there are some drawbacks. Learning to fly isn’t cheap. Another $50,000-$100,000 on top of the costs of a college education is realistic for most. But just as with college tuition, there are loans available to help pay for flying education. And one can flight instruct part-time while attending college to not only help pay for classes, but also gain valuable flight experience. Obviously the military, either active duty or national guard, is another potential option for defraying the costs of flight training.
Too many newbies make this mistake. They think they can avoid ALL online business start-up time and expenses by joining an affiliate program and using the free site they get as their main site. It's a mistake. The best affiliates in EVERY program have their own website where they bring ALL their traffic first. From a "home base" like this you are free to make personal recommendations, promote a variety of programs and earn income other ways such as advertising or selling your own products and services. Growing your own site is a major key to growing serious long-term affiliate income.
Great post, I also liked your one on starting a fashion blog. Do you have a post on affiliate linking through social media? I’m pretty confused on whats acceptable, especially for Pinterest. It seems Shopstyle {Shopsense} and rewardStyle seem to work on Pinterest. I started my website on Weebly.. so I am making the oh-not-so-fun transition over to WordPress currently.

This forumla you have makes sense for some people, but not all. Case in point – I went to a college in the midwest that no one has heard of, graduated with a 3.2 GPA, and at the age of 29 closed the year with a $110k salary. My boyfriend went to one of the top 10 public institutions in the country, graduated with a 3.8 GPA, and last year earned about $20k. Yes, having a degree from a top-tier institution may have increased my current salary even more, but I think had I gone that route I would have went into a less exciting career and given myself less chances to fail. Instead, with my average academic background, I’ve been able to live out many careers in my 20s – as a business journalist, and then in a variety of roles in startups where I could put my writing skills to use. I learned how to negotiate and that’s why I’m making six figures today (and I also have a sizable stock package that could be worth more a few years down the road.) My salary clearly has nothing to do with my academic performance. Sure, Google would never hire me because I don’t meet their hiring criteria, but who needs Google when you can start out as one of the first employees of a startup and help make that startup worth hundreds of millions of dollars?


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This isn’t a cheap product that you can buy on the off-chance that it is useful. Instead, the full product costs $1,997. Yes, really. It costs almost $2,000. You can also pay in two payments of $1,100, which are 30 days apart. I'm sorry, but I really can't justify purchasing, or recommending that you purchase a product for two grand. I've purchased two-thousand-dollar products before and they have never been worth it. The most I've paid for a product and been satisfied with it was around $500.
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