The most important lesson I got from the book is the importance of choosing a niche; it helps build a loyal community, get expertise and great, contextualized advertising. However, except for the generic "start by identifying your own interests, passions, and energy levels for topics", there's not a lot of direction about how to choose a profitable niche. There also isn't much about search engine optimization (which I fortunately covered in another book) or about keyword research. However, a lot of the things that Rowse and Garrett hold important (niching, ads, etc) aren't necessarily the be-all and end-all of popular blogging.
I rarely work more than 40 hours (neither does my boss), my job is challenging in terms of problem solving but not stressful- read i’m not bored, my coworkers generally keep to themselves – no office drama, I get a nice raise and bonus every year, time off is generous, I work from home 25% of the time and I make around 150k all in. Graduate school was free through research and my undergrad degree cost less than my annual salary – paid for by bank of daddy. My house costs less than my annual salary. I don’t know of any other field that gives you such a high reward for very little effort. I didn’t have to go to med school for 10 years neither do I have to work 60 hour weeks or wear a stuffy suit. I wear blouses and jeans to work everyday and I’m easily the best dressed. Instead of jumping ship to management like many Engineers I’m developing my skills in a highly technical and specialized area with hopes of becoming an Independent Contractor around the 12 year mark, targeting around $220 and hour. You can do anything with a Chemical Engineering degree – both the diploma and the skills you will learn, I can’t sell this dream enough!
Household income changes over time, with income gains being substantially larger for the upper percentiles than for the lower percentiles.[19] All areas of the income strata have seen their incomes rise since the late 1960s, especially during the late 1990s.[18] The overall increase in household income is largely the result of an increase in the percentage of households with more than one income earner. While households with just one income earner, most commonly the male, were the norm in the middle of the 20th century, 42% of all households and the vast majority of married couple households now have two or more income earners. With so many households now having two income earners, the substantial increase in household income is easily explained:[15]
As an IT. I work a 9-5 schedule 40+ hours a week but it’s not enough. I have big dreams that require $100K to fulfill. I am extremely ambitious, driven and motivated. However I keep looking but cannot find anything that would give me that much. I now have certificates and experience and keep applying to different jobs but no luck still. Any advice?
Alright, so I started doing construction work for my parents as they remodeled their house. They paid me 10 an hour. This probably started when I was ~ 13. Then I started lifeguarding at 15 and did that until I was 16 (2 summers). I would work about 60 hours a week during that time + continue to work construction on my days off from lifeguarding. Between 13-16 I was able to stockpile ~25k. I used 10k to buy a BMW cash at 16 (which I still drive to this day). The car was a depreciating asset for sure. So I went into junior year of high school with about 15k in cash and a 10k BMW (which was worth 15k but the market was falling out under itself so the dealer sold to me because I had cash and he needed money).
ShareASale offers pay-per-sale, pay-per-lead, and pay-per-click programs, with a minimum payout of $50. ShareASale is my favorite affiliate program network because of their large marketplace (they have tons of blogger-friendly affiliate programs) and the ease of use. If you want to make money through affiliate marketing, I highly recommend you give ShareASale a try.
There are some field of study where making 100K+ is quite tough (think of any child related job; teacher, daycare worker, child animation, etc). There are people who will never make 100K because their talents are not rewarded by money in our society (you will have a hard time finding a firefighter or police officer making 6 figures while all doctors will make it).
For 2018, he’s most interested in arbitraging the lower property valuations and higher net rental yields in the heartland of America through RealtyShares, one of the largest real estate crowdfunding platforms based in SF. He sold his SF rental home for 30X annual gross rent in 2017 and reinvested $550,000 of the proceeds in real estate crowdfunding for potentially higher returns.
So there we have it. Great grades, great schools, and working in particular industries will make you $100,000 a year in your 20s. This post names 30 firms which employ thousands combined and there are many more firms out there which pay just as well. The great thing is that if you stick it out at any of these firms for 10+ years, there’s a great chance you will be a millionaire in your 30s and a multi-millionaire in your 40s.
I want to say thank you for taking the time to focus on useful content going into future years, as opposed to regurgitating something you read out of a hard cover marketing book from 1991. The original reason I came here however, was looking for tips / information on a general structure for paying taxes reliably on affiliate earnings in addition to disclaimer examples. Ive searched through different key word combinations and due to financial diversity on a national scale I can understand why this information is scarce. That being said, as long as a solid disclaimer is made about the information being a rough guideline etc. I think it would be extremely useful as most start up affiliates don’t know a thing about VAT, or how to separate their take home earnings from the tax they owe. I am currently residing in Alberta, Canada for your reference, but any information or a lead you could give me would be most helpful.

Without doubt that was by far the best summary of “Greatest Tips” I have read to date. It is so confusing out there…I want to help my son who struggles with cranky bossy managers to empowering him and havening him live life on his terms. I know affiliate marketing is the way out but where to start?? Do we set up on Shopify and offer other people’s products? Do we set up a blog with a few good links? Do you go to clickbank and peddle the China trinkets etc? Its a tough one to sort but this tutorial was an easy to understand read and you have my word that any of the hosting or other services offered I will use your affiliate link to thank you for sharing your knowledge and your mistakes. Sincerest thanks Tom!
It’s important to factor in hours worked with salary earned. I earned a six figure salary and at 40 hours a week would have earned $65 an hour, breaking it down to basics. I averaged 70 hours a week, and the salary broken down to hourly was roughly $35. This is not factoring in insurance or other benefits. Quality of life was poor and I shared a high level of stress along with my other colleagues. We weren’t doing life saving work, this was in tech. It wasn’t worth it in the long run! The burnout was a lesson to… Read more »
Good luck to us all that have worked hard for what we have in ways that someone more privileged, doesn’t understand. physical hard labor to get where you need to be, not want, but need. And to then still struggle. With hospital bills from the labor you work so hard just to hardly make it by, actually to not quite hardly make it by, because of those those dr bills we have to pay for our children and ourselves from physically working so hard to just survive.
There is a big difference between “information” and “instruction.” They did a good job providing information but terrible on instructions. Therefore it really isn’t for newbies as promoted. As a certified tutor I learned and practiced strategies like “peer to peer” mentoring, intellectual scaffolding and tackled the Zone of Proximal Development” for foreign or special needs students on a college level.
I love your post. I have been following you over the years. I want to shed some light to others who are in pursuit of the “Six Figure Salary”. Upon graduation, I set a goal to make six figures by 30. I started off making only $33k a year. However, I out worked everyone in my office and established a reputation as a hard work and smart worker. I stayed at the firm (insurance) for 4 years and somehow networked and found an opportunity in management consulting. I stayed there for 10 months and made approximately $95k. Next, i took the experience came back to the insurance industry and now make $125k at the age of 27…. 3 years earlier!. My best advice for everyone is to work hard, follow the opportunities, strive for constant improvement, and be open to change. PS. I went to a “B” school and was a “B” student. Unfortunately, I was an underdog through out my career because of my school, but I balanced it by tremendous work ethic and self taught myself in business. Work hard, keep reading, and continue to improve. You will make six figures!
Location is a big factor. As you know, six figures in SF is not six figures in the Midwest. Income is very relative depending on the local cost of living. I have many family members and friends who are teachers (all in the Midwest) and none are close to six figures nor aspire to have such income unless they have outside hustles. When I was entering college 30 years ago, I considered teaching until I saw the salaries and how they plateaued. I was too money motivated and pursued a different path. Now I am in my late 40s and winding down my work schedule and considering becoming a part-time business teacher at a local college and/or private HS since money is no longer my motivation. I would like to see more entrepreneurial education opportunities for teens.
Selecting your target for instance, is all about finding profitable products to promote on JVZoo.com, JVNotifypro.com etc. As action-packed as that caption sounds, it’s just basic information that you probably already have. Chances are you already know how to find profitable products to promote across the different affiliate marketing platforms on the Internet.
My question is, do you think this is a worthwhile method? Or do you think I should be creating a longer blog post and focus more of my energy on building backlinks to that post? Then with that specific blog post should I be linking to my review pages or to the affiliates? As right now I’m mainly building backlinks towards the review pages but would it be worthwhile to create a post, build link juice to it and just pass it back on to the review page?
I’ve already committed thousands to AWOL(I’m 17 by the way) and I believe in quality products as such to promote. Do I need to purchase SFM training eventually? I am willing to do so, in order to stay congruent with diversifying income and promoting valued, justly priced products, just as the top earners do so. Please let me know what you can say about the terms of being an affiliate with SFM.

Not that I recommend this as a permanent lifestyle, especially if you want to have kids some day, but you could always take one of those “Most Dangerous Jobs” as an oil platform worker, Alaska crabber, etc. which pay well, or even get into a decent skilled job in a manufacturing facility with a base of say, 50-60K after a few years, but work every shift of overtime you can get your hands on. Granted, I used to see many people miserable doing this, but they were bringing in 6 figures as a mechanic, pipefitter or in some cases, even HS level line workers. Finally, you can get a side job – like blogging!
A great point you made there though. Too many people try to take on too much at once and end up spreading themselves too thin – trying to conquer all the niches at the same time. Marketers also do this with advertising. Instead of sticking with one platform until they are generating a consistent number of leads they will jump from platform to platform, in essence chucking a load of crap at a wall and seeing what sticks.
Perhaps; I think a larger reason for why there are so few $100,000 earners is due to relatively difficulty in getting a job that pays that much (or creating income source(s) to generate that level of income) as compared to a less than $100,000 a year position. I also think there’s more than a few people who happen to gravitate toward professions that don’t pay such high salaries; if you are a kindergarten teacher, and get a lot of personal satisfaction out of your job, you might have no desire to go back to school to become, say, a venture capitalist. The fact of the matter is that not every profession we as a society need pays more than $100,000 a year; which is probably good, because if they did, prices would adjust to the point that you’d need to earn $1,000,000 a year just to be upper middle class.
The problem with affiliate marketing, like many other home business options, are the so-called gurus and get-rich-quick programs that suggest affiliate marketing can be done fast and with little effort. Odds are you've read claims of affiliate marketing programs that say you can make hundreds of thousands of dollars a month doing almost nothing ("Three clicks to rich!"). Or, they suggest you can set up your affiliate site, and then forget it, except to check your bank deposits.

When one of our readers at The Write Life buys Chris Guillebeau’s $58 Unconventional Guide to Freelance Writing through our link, for example, we earn $29. When James Chartrand’s Damn Fine Words course sells for $1,599 through our site, we earn $200. Lots of creators offer affiliate programs for their products; the key is finding products that appeal to your audience, so you readers want to purchase them.


ps. collecting these Facebook polls is one of the main reasons I was able to get so many SiteGround sales. Yes, I’m suggesting SiteGround for your host, but this is also a strategy that can be used to collect unbiased reviews. Just go to Facebook and search “SiteGround poll” and you can dig up some great stuff – you can do this with lots of affiliate products/companies.
Personally, I don’t hate the job at the giant tech company, but it’s also something I don’t want to be doing for very long. Along with my wife, we’re taking the approach of living simply and saving ~70% of our income so we can walk away from it all financially independent in 5-10 years if we choose. If any of my side projects take off, we might be able to move onto a more digital-nomad type of location independent life even sooner than that.
Well, Chico State has a reputation as a party school, so this might not be a fair comparison. I personally went to a program that was extremely well respected in the arts, but as an academic institution was just fair. In actuality I had some really amazing professors (some who had PhDs from Ivy League schools, some who didn’t) but my choice was made based on the quality of my program versus the overall school. I did decide on a liberal arts school versus just an arts school because I wanted the option to expand outside of just an arts population. So, in that sense, if Chico State happened to have a better program in the field my “son” was going into versus Harvard, I’d say go for it. I’m not making the argument that if one has the academic intellect to do well in school that he/she should avoid going to a top-tier academic institution, what I am trying to say is that it’s not the only way to do well in life. In fact, I’ve met many people from top-tier schools who act entitled and think certain work is below them, whereas I’ve been hired and tend to be a respected employee because I’m willing to get my hands dirty. Again, this is not saying every Ivy graduate is this way, but same goes for every graduate from a “Chico” as you put it. When I was applying to college I got into Rutgers which is a fairly good school academically (not an Ivy, but at least up there with the top public schools) and I chose to go to a school that was less prestigious on the academic front because it was a better fit. I was a theatre major. I ended up switching to minor in journalism and sociology. I had an internship with Emmy Award-winning documentary filmmakers who had a program set up with my school, and was able to help compile research for cable TV news programming. Point being, the opportunities for success are everywhere. If you’re really smart, you’d skip college altogether and spend your college tuition building a business or two. Sure, you might never have the stability of working in a consulting firm or at a big tech company, but the people who get really rich (or at the least who lead “rich lives”) are often the ones who don’t follow the typical road to success.

One of the major stumbling blocks that hinder job seekers from gaining employment is usually the issue of experience. Most employers will often require their candidate to have worked in a similar niche for quite some time. This program grants job seekers such as vital resource. It is especially relevant to those who intend to pursue a career in sales and marketing.
I support Sam on this topic. Yes you CAN at any age. I did. $100K fresh out of college and 4 years later I make more than double that in Finance. I didn’t go to a top school. I did get a high GPA, but not in a major that anyone cares about (English). I’m not particularly brilliant or talented. I had no connections. I did not do any networking. I don’t work at a BB either. But I am extremely focused, driven, I learn quickly, I don’t repeat mistakes, I am able to work intensely for long hours, and I produce real results.

This is great for you because the products literally sell themselves, and as a 7 figure franchisee you get to keep 100% commissions on every sale that you generate promoting it which includes upsells, downsells, recurring products, and the high ticket backend product that I am talking about in this blog post the 7 figure franchisee business opportunity.
Beside reading this post which is great for information. i really loved your comment. I feel you. I am also 31yo currently making around 100k living in an Eastern European country and trying to make more by finding new oportunities. Somehow i connected with your comment, i feel atracted to it. If you would like to continue comunicating in private just let me know. Cheers
If you have an inclination to chemistry, biology, can present your science well and work well across line functions, the biotech / pharma industry is a great place to build a career. And it’s not cyclical. Huge unmet need in so many diseases and the constant demand for more efficacious medicines will always require innovative young scientists to come to the fore.
Set your price. Usually, websites sell for 3-5 times the yearly revenue. So if you had a blog for six months that made $30,000 in those six months, your yearly revenue would be about $60,000. You could then sell your site for $180,000 or more depending on your buyer. Bigger companies are most likely to spend larger amounts of money on a website than small companies are.
Internship definitely helps. My GPA was so bad I was embarrassed to tell anyone, but one internship landed me another, then landed me a full time job, and now I could go where ever I want. If you don’t have GPA or internship, I’d say you might be screwed and your starting point after graduation will be much lower than those with internship experience or good GPA. There was a point I felt like my life was over and I’ll never be able to get a job after graduation. There were also thoughts of working at McDs or a sales rep at the mall.
I grew up in SF. Big city. And for high school I went to the ghetto side of town where a lot of the teachers were burned out. A few of them left for private school after 1-2 years of teaching where the pay is a lot higher. I would have done the same. At an inner city school, it’s more work and stress for less money and less respect. The actual kids weren’t great to deal with either. High schoolers aren’t as cute as 5th and 6th graders when they’re mad. These kids carried pocket knifes now!
I just graduated college at at the age of 23 and now working in the tech industry (hardware) in south bay area with a salary of 70k + 25% salary bonus every year and 80k in stock vested 5 years given every 2 years. However, promotions and hierarchy in the company seems to be very flat. Plus, it seems that the role i’m holding is extremely specialized. No other company will pay this much for someone with 0 experience in the industry. Now, how do i overcome this “putting all eggs in a basket” thing, and start rolling with decent raises without risking any setback? At the age of 23, i’m sometimes sleepless at night to think of a way to optimize my future while not giving up any advantages that i’ve tried so hard to get. I absolutely love my job, but any suggestion to have a backup plan in case the worst thing happens ? Was thinking about learning extra software or data science stuff, but you just mentioned that I would likely need desire, a focused desire if anything.
I’ll admit that even on my own blog, AlexisGrant.com, I’m sometimes lazy about taking an extra minute or two to pull an affiliate link when I see an opportunity to use one in a post. But if you want to benefit as your traffic grows, you have to be consistent about adding those affiliate links every time, even if you don’t expect the post to take off. This is something we’re religious about on The Write Life (thank you, editor @Heathervdh!), so when we get unexpected traffic to a post, we earn.
First I want to just say well done with what you have accomplished. You have done an amazing job. I’m not really one to post a comment on blogs as I’m sure everyone says. But the thing that struck me the most about you is I can tell your a great individual. You love cats, as my wife and I do. We also have rescue cats. You are a very generous and honest person and that is most likely why you also have done well. Very authentic and honest. I’m in the process of building an affiliate amazon site. So I can relate to the content side of things. I’m already a customer of siteground but If I wasn’t I’d happily sign up through you. I have bookmarked your site as I’d like to come back and read a little more and keep an eye on your progress. Thanks for taking the time to write this post. It’s one of the best blog posts I’ve read. Take care Tom
If I were hiring a college graduate, I’d pay more attention to field of study than GPA. Given the choice between someone who got a 4.0 in English or a 3.0 in mathematics, I’d be far more inclined to hire the latter. Even for a job irrelevant to both disciplines. The math student had a tougher workload and almost certainly knows how to attack a problem better.
If you are a teacher and salary is your number one priority you better make sure your bargaining team knows, or better yet get involved in bargaining yourself, because the people with other priorities like pensions, healthcare, and paid leave certainly speak up in my local! Though thanks to the incredible work in states like WV, OK, and AZ I think teacher pay is finally being addressed.
Hey, Sam! Great article/read. Also, i’m not sure if you’re the right guy to ask (bother? lol) but I just turned 20 and I basically got really mediocre grades at my mediocre community college and i’ll be getting my diploma next year. Not that getting into policing will be too much difficulty, but being a high ranking officer, such as a chief, that pays very well might be a bit of a stretch later down the line. I could go back and EASLY get A’s but the idea of going back to school and doing the same thing… ehhh…. I might consider doing it later, perhaps when i’m 30ish and gotten some experience as being an officer. What would you recommend? I’m open to anything. Thanks mate.
By another measure - the number of square feet per person in the home - the average home in the United States has more than 700 square feet per person, 50% - 100% more than in other high-income countries (though this indicator may be regarded as an accident of geography, climate and social preference, both within the USA and beyond it) but this metric indicates even those in the lowest income percentiles enjoy more living space than the middle classes in most European nations. Similarly ownership levels of 'gadgets' and access to amenities are exceptionally high compared to many other countries.[16][17]
Two income-earner households are more common among the top quintile of households than the general population: 2006 U.S. Census Bureau data indicates that over three quarters, 76%, of households in the top quintile, with annual incomes exceeding $91,200, had two or more income earners compared to just 42% among the general population and a small minority in the bottom three quintiles. As a result, much of the rising income inequity between the upper and lower percentiles can be explained through the increasing percentage of households with two or more incomes.[15][19]

I, too, work in an industry with salaries that are tied to budgets and salary cohorts. But I have found that side hustles, both in and out of my field, help to increase my income. It is sad that we have to give up even more of our time to get there, but I guess the sacrifice makes the reward even more satisfying??? In any case- thank you for sharing your journey, your goals and your insights. It is comforting to me to realize that there are others in my circumstances.


There is no standard formula, it depends on your taxes and other deductions taken, which vary from individual to individual. Taxes vary by region, filing status and withholding allowances. Deductions include retirement contributions, union dues, insurance payments, student loan payments, child support, or others depending on yoru situation. You can do a google search for "pay calculator" or "net salaray calculator" and look at the ones that come up. I can't find something specific to my area (including taxes from the city, county and state as well as federal) but they can be helpful if you want to estimate. Also, paystubs include an itemized listing of deductions, so you can see you net and gross for a current job on your paystub.
Hello Clicky! In terms of connecting with affiliate marketers, a good place to start would be the major affiliate networks in your niche. Two examples off the top of my head are http://www.uk.cj.com/ and https://freshpress.media/ – these sites are heavily used by affiliates but you’ll want to make sure you have great visibility when people are searching for affiliate programs in your niche. A great way to do this is to find out what the top business in your niche is doing in terms of their affiliate offer and match with something similar. Another way of attracting affiliates is to perform some market research and find out the top blogs in your niche, then reach out to the owners with a delicious affiliate program deal they cannot refuse. In terms of logo’s and banner ads, most affiliate don’t really use them anymore (from my own experiences). But again, I would research everything before making any decisions. Hope this helps!

The kids books side is ULTRA competitive. Trust me on this. I know many women who have tried and failed. This is why it’s partially a great reason to join the Yakezie Product Review Team. After a year of building relationships with agents, publishers, authors… guess what? If you want to write your own book review and make some pitches, you’ve got the automatic in already! Help them, and they will eventually come around and help you.


The reality in affiliate marketing is that it's like most other work-at-home ventures; there are a few who are filthy rich, a good number who are successful enough to meet their goals, and a ton who aren't making anything. So, the question isn't really whether or not affiliate marketing is a viable income option (it is), but whether or not you can make affiliate marketing work for you. Only you can decide that. But to help, here are some tips.
Another advantage public schools have is their far broader acceptance of AP and community college courses (remember Step 1?). After all of my credits were applied, I entered college as a junior and graduated in 3 years instead of 4. That’s an extra savings of $10,500 or $50,000 if I were smart enough to get into a school like MIT. I’m not even including room and board and textbook expenses. Absolutely huge.
Sam, in eastern Canada, anything over 40K-50K per person is starting to be considered “wealthy”. The oil province is a little more lenient in this regard since they have oil money to compensate. In fact, in Canada we practice wealth redistribution on a provincial scale, and the rich provinces must contribute in order to support the poorer ones. Quebec receives a bit more than $1000 per capita IIRC.
Now, here’s the current conundrum. I still don’t make six figures. I have made some really smart money moves, but even now, I’m not slated to pull in six figures for another decade. I have two choices. The first option lets me sit back and let time work its magic. Each year of service nets me a small raise. It also gives our money in the market more time to do its thing. Conversely, the second choice involves monetizing our talents and skills. Otherwise known as prioritizing the side hustle or the passion project.
It seems like you no longer want to work so much and are trying to break free ASAP in your mid-to-late 20s? Is this true? If so, why do you think you burned out so quickly from petro engineering, especially if it only takes you 40 hours a week? 40 hours a week is a walk in the park in comparison to banking, consulting, law, medical etc. Why not just work as a petro engineer for longer?
Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links on this page above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
I’m just learning about this and I have never done it before. I just a had a question or two. Can I work from my phone is a iPhone 6s. And I’m not asking you to go through the entire thiing in your answer but how do I get started and how will I get the training I need. I had to get out of the out of town work due to my dad getting sick so I wanted to be home more, and one more thing does it cost a lot to for getting the adds or material needed to start making money. If so how much or some of the cost just ballpark figures will I have to spend while I’m up and going. I’m serious about it and just though I could get some advice and answer a few of the questions. Thanks Brett
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