The need for people with your knowledge to help us majority, could really help our country as a whole. Please take into consideration not just monetary value of your life, but what you can do to help us in need. I had a 3.9 in highschool, 3.7 at Purdue engineering, life happenings made me drop out of college, i had to earn money for my family, and help support them. I am now 41, a single mom of two girls, was able to leave a highly abusive marriage alive, working my ass off to make ends meet and it is never ending….We could use someone with your knowledge to help the millions that have had “bad luck”, been “dealt a shitty hand at life”. I guarantee the majority of us are the hardest working Americans in the country.
As I run a blogging blog, which is a niche where finding a right affiliate product is tough as well. Till now I have written just one “ultimate article” and I’m still struggling to get it ranked. I’m just about to send an email to YOU or to Glen to get feedback for that “ultimate article” of mine, and appreciate you guys help me with that, just like Glen helped Slavko.
You should still shoot to be in the top 5% of your class. Pure determination alone can get you into the top 10%, and that’s likely going to get you a spot in a public university. For example, students in Texas are guaranteed admission into any public university in the state if they are within the top 7% of their class (formerly 10%). There’s a similar program at Georgia. Check if your state schools have similar guaranteed admission criteria.
The only thing to skip is the fancy school because most of my colleagues went to midwestern state schools. To Sam’s point, many engineers see an MBA as a way to move up when they get stuck and wonder “what’s next”… depending on circumstance, I’ve found this to be a bit of an illusion without a total career change. Anyway, I’m self-aware enough to admit that the glad-handing and corporate buzzword stuff isn’t my strength, so I’m happy to chill in the very low 6 figures with reduced effort now that I’ve mastered the job. To get ahead, I leveraged simplistic living/frugality (65% savings rate) as opposed to further career growth.
We live in a modest 3 bed 2 bath house that is about 1,300 square feet. I drive a Toyota Prius that I bought in 2013 for $24,000 which I paid off in early 2015. My wife drives a Subaru Forester which we bought for about $25,000 and will have it paid off in less than 2 years from now. My point is, we know better than to spend our money on luxuries at this early stage in our financial careers. If we invest all of this excess now, how much better off will we be 15 years from now when we are in our early 40’s?
Want to earn a six-figure salary? Choose your next career path carefully, and get ready to make a serious investment in education. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook, only 55 out of 818 listed occupations offer median salaries of $100,000 per year or more—and 53 of them typically require at least a bachelor’s degree.
Google Autocomplete – go to google.com, start typing a phrase and look at the dropdown autocomplete results. You can use the underscore character “_” to have Google fill-in-the-blank. Just make sure the last character you type is an underscore. Try using plurals and change the word ordering to see different results. This is how I find 90% of my keywords.
My parents had never went to college. When I applied to school, it was mostly based on schools that received my SAT scores and followed up with advertisement. A lot of those schools are private liberal arts colleges. I went to the one that cost the least in terms of loans. Sometimes I wonder if I’d applied to Yale, Harvard or MIT if I would have gotten in. It’s more a curiosity at this point.
Hi, thanks for another awesome article. I understand EVERYTHING on this subject but what’s the best course of action when your website is lacking a tight focus? My site is based around the concept of stop doing the things you hate and start doing what you really want. Which started out with ‘how to quit your job’ but I thought that was too limiting so now it now covers all aspects of lifestyle, interacting with others, thoughts on life and health & fitness. (using personal experience where applicable).
I believe for many people including myself, the elusive passion that yields happiness and fulfillment is still unknown even well into adulthood. Personally, if money wasn’t a factor I’m not sure what I would be doing…and that’s what I’d like to figure out. In the meanwhile though, building financial independence can provide options down the road and keep you flexible.
Yes, people who perform on stage look like a big group of people and they have union. Perhaps when you read the article about the strike you were surprised to know symphony players earn six figure salary, but only about 1% gets to play in the 100k+ salary orchestra from top music schools (Juilliard, Curtis, NEC, etc). I am a lucky few who plays in a major orchestra with 100k+ pay, but I spent my 20s practicing everyday earning $10k-$20k until I finally won the audition at age 30. (33 now) In order to be competitive in auditions, I own (parents and grandparents paid) an instrument that costs $300k. Most of the straight A students from top music school I know now earn below $50k. As a music student, it is a big success if one wins an orchestral job with $50k salary. Many try to teach and freelance at a $5k orchestra job to scrape by.
I’m 29. I started a career in sales right out of High School and found my glass ceiling. I went back to school at 26, graduated with a degree in finance at 28 in may 2015, I just got my first offer as a securities specialist with a top 5 bank, (it’s an operations position in global market settlements) the pay is less than my draw was when I was selling, and I might as well live in my car because I’m going to spend about 2 and a half hours in the car everyday. I am trying to determine if I am selling myself short, or if this is a good place to get started. I ultimately want to work mutual funds. I’m trying to decide if I should keep looking for another position or hold out for more.
The problem with affiliate marketing, like many other home business options, are the so-called gurus and get-rich-quick programs that suggest affiliate marketing can be done fast and with little effort. Odds are you've read claims of affiliate marketing programs that say you can make hundreds of thousands of dollars a month doing almost nothing ("Three clicks to rich!"). Or, they suggest you can set up your affiliate site, and then forget it, except to check your bank deposits.
I don’t know of your friend’s particular situation but I’m curious as to what his resume look likes or what kind of grades he made. Is he willing to relocate or is he looking for a specific type of job? There are so many reasons why someone with a Chemical Engineering degree will say they haven’t found a job but I’ve found that top of that list is people who decided they hated the major a little too late, made poor grades or those who are not open to relocation or field work. Four years is a long long time for a ChemE to not find a job, he’s doing something wrong.
But if you want to make money – there are things to do besides be an engineer and having been one of those that did a bachelors, medical degree and post doc before I ever had a real job – worked fine even with the loans. I was the first in my family to acheive a graduate degree, paid for it with loans, but my niche career choice I found out about during my pathology traing way down the line worked out.
Another problem that I see with Internet marketing in general is that ther are always too many bonuses attached to the product. I wonder if those bonuses are really better than the product itself? Imagine going into Wal-Mart and at the checkout line before you pay for your stuff, the casheer starts spouting off all of the bonuses and offers that you could get before you even purchased that product? Can you imagine how much time that would take? And all yo wanted to do was just purchase a bag of Oreos.
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