I do have to comment though on your section where you mention pursuing an MBA for a higher salary. This is risky. In order to attend one of those top universities full-time (because I’m fairly certain those universities don’t have part-time programs, and if so, part-time programs are not looked at with the same respect as full-time from recruiters), one must give up 21-24 months of employment (which, in my current situation is about $140-145K) as well as pay $120-140 for the program. That’s $280,000 in costs.
I just graduated college at at the age of 23 and now working in the tech industry (hardware) in south bay area with a salary of 70k + 25% salary bonus every year and 80k in stock vested 5 years given every 2 years. However, promotions and hierarchy in the company seems to be very flat. Plus, it seems that the role i’m holding is extremely specialized. No other company will pay this much for someone with 0 experience in the industry. Now, how do i overcome this “putting all eggs in a basket” thing, and start rolling with decent raises without risking any setback? At the age of 23, i’m sometimes sleepless at night to think of a way to optimize my future while not giving up any advantages that i’ve tried so hard to get. I absolutely love my job, but any suggestion to have a backup plan in case the worst thing happens ? Was thinking about learning extra software or data science stuff, but you just mentioned that I would likely need desire, a focused desire if anything.
Is becoming a $100k+ earner in orchestras like SF symphony just as competitive as joining a major sports league? Maybe. It’s just that $100k+ symphony job openings are so rare that no one can really count on it. Orchestra is a very unique job and often general public don’t know how people got there. Of course not everyone value and want to support arts. But when those few $100k orchestra job salary disappear, the live symphony music we hear today will die.

Upper middle class[1] (15%) Highly-educated (often with graduate degrees), most commonly salaried, professionals and middle management with large work autonomy. Upper middle class[1] (15%) Highly-educated (often with graduate degrees) professionals & managers with household incomes varying from the high 5-figure range to commonly above $100,000. The rich (5%) Households with net worth of $1 million or more; largely in the form of home equity. Generally have college degrees.
As oil truly runs out, I believe economics will spur investment into alternative energy rather than politicians or environmentalists. As much as people may hate Big Oil, they are the ones best positioned to start the process. They will have the capital from record oil profits. They already have all the engineers and R&D on staff. Most of all, implementing gigantic capital projects has been their bread and butter. Sorry, this is probably more than you asked for.
If you work for a major (Shell, Chevron, BP, Conoco) they pay about 90 – 100k starting for petroleum engineers and about 70-80k for mechanical/chemical/electrical engineers. The exception is Exxon (they pay more because it’s a terrible work environment, but they make the most profits). If you work for a smaller independent, perhaps it gets bumped up 10k or so. Bonuses are typically 10-20%. I’m a recent graduate in Petroleum Engineering working for Shell.

I am on this guys email list and the only reason is that despite his over hyped products (and they are over hyped I bought one and was really disappointed), the emails are quite entertaining. You know how you can tell some of his products don’t work? he has a course on creating highly engaging Facebook fan pages and yet his fan page is completely dead!!! lmao. And these are the types of products you get to promote if you purchase the 7 figure franchise.


The reality in affiliate marketing is that it's like most other work-at-home ventures; there are a few who are filthy rich, a good number who are successful enough to meet their goals, and a ton who aren't making anything. So, the question isn't really whether or not affiliate marketing is a viable income option (it is), but whether or not you can make affiliate marketing work for you. Only you can decide that. But to help, here are some tips.
Anyway, back to this program called the Seven Figure Franchise. There have been many affiliate programs that have come and gone over the years promising all sorts of wealth and prosparity. Now don’t get me wrong, I do believe that people make money with affiliate marketing, but like some of the people her have mentioned, you have to do it in the right way.
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