Incomes for those employed, full-time, year-round and over the age of twenty-five ranged from $20,826 ($17,422 if including those who worked part-time[7]) for those with less than a ninth grade education to $100,000 for those with professional degrees ($82,473 if including those who work part-time[7]). The median income for individuals with doctorates was $79,401 ($70,853 if including those who work part-time[7]).[29]
I’m 23 y/o and have been going to community college on and off since h/s. Didn’t really care about grades the first 2 years so that really screwed up my gpa in the beginning. Long story short, I’m sitting at a 3.0 gpa currently and want to change my situation. I’m going to take school and grades more seriously. I have to stay one more year at community college to complete the required transfer classes to be able to attend a university. I can probably raise my gpa to a 3.1 before i transfer, but I don’t think i can transfer to a good business school with that gpa. So I plan to transfer to a Cal State and try to keep a 4.0 for 2 years until I graduate so my average gpa from community college and University would be about 3.5-3.6. Then, my next step would be to apply to a top 15 business school
Hi John, 30 years old with no experience is no problem. You could realistically be employable at a major airline by age 35, and you’d still have a 30 year career ahead of you. It took me longer than that to get here, but as I mentioned before, there’s a severe pilot shortage coming and I think anyone starting now will have a quicker path to the majors than I did.
I could have promoted WP Engine (hosting company) for $200/sale with no tier program to climb – sounds pretty good right? But when I checked ShareASale I saw their reversal rates were 24%! Just to give you an idea SiteGround’s reversals are less than 10%. WP Engine starts at $29/month while SiteGround’s is $3.95/month, plus SiteGround has a better reputation. I had to climb a tier program to get SiteGround’s $150/sale, but long-term my research paid off.
Sounds like you need to go back to high school. Lack of punctuation, capitalization, apostrophes, btw? BTW?! Look at how you’re talking and yet you’re complaining about an article to help people get the big picture? Pathetic really. Someone like you shouldn’t even be reading a journal/article like this, when basic grammar isn’t even part of your being or intelligence, well lack of intelligence I should say. Best of luck to you. Griping on something like this isn’t making you any more money than those who read this and get motivated. Feedback is always welcome when things like this are posted, but you’re so rude and ignorant that it really defeats the purpose. Best of luck to you
The only thing to skip is the fancy school because most of my colleagues went to midwestern state schools. To Sam’s point, many engineers see an MBA as a way to move up when they get stuck and wonder “what’s next”… depending on circumstance, I’ve found this to be a bit of an illusion without a total career change. Anyway, I’m self-aware enough to admit that the glad-handing and corporate buzzword stuff isn’t my strength, so I’m happy to chill in the very low 6 figures with reduced effort now that I’ve mastered the job. To get ahead, I leveraged simplistic living/frugality (65% savings rate) as opposed to further career growth.

For policing in the media, it’s something I’ve been covering often in my blog. Some situations talk about themselves with body cameras. Officers make mistakes. Other times there is no mistake, but it “looks” bad even if fully justifiable. Other times it’s fully justified to those with a legal grounding, but the public is shocked. Hopefully without offering platitudes everything officers do are on the table for observation. Regardless of the current issue, if someone calls, we will show up.


Hi John – thanks for the angle on applying applied math to the petroleum industry. I’ve been surprised at how disinterested my daughter’s math dept. seems to be in giving her tips like that to explore. Maybe I’m not all that surprised…in the west side of WA state a general apathy seems to have gradually settled in over the last few years like low fog on a cool morning. People just don’t seemed to stop caring about service…like they’re still doing their jobs but checked out at some point. They look at you with “gone fishing” signs in both eyes and leave their pride on the floor like a dropped fork. I’m not sure if others have noticed a similar change where they live – it aint a good sign socially or economically.
1. I’m no longer a solopreneur. If I was a solopreneur who netted $5K from a website I ran on my own, that would be pretty darn good. But I don’t do everything myself. Instead, I run a company that has a lot of expenses. My team manages a number of blogs, and I pay six team members each month, as well as dozens of writers who contribute to our blogs, plus a tech-support team. That $5K goes into company revenue, not directly into my pocket.
As of 2002, there were approximately 146,000 (0.1%) households with incomes exceeding $1,500,000, while the top 0.01% or 11,000 households had incomes exceeding $5,500,000. The 400 highest tax payers in the nation had gross annual household incomes exceeding $87,000,000. Household incomes for this group have risen more dramatically than for any other. As a result, the gap between those who make less than one and half million dollars annually (99.9% of households) and those who make more (0.1%) has been steadily increasing, prompting The New York Times to proclaim that the "Richest Are Leaving Even the Rich Far Behind."[43]
It’d be hard for Google to argue with this content not adding value. After all, some of the guides have received close to 10,000 shares and have been used by the brands themselves to educate their own customers. Generally speaking, each guide takes about 40-50 hours to produce, and is benchmarked to beat the best existing piece of content on the topic in virtually every aspect (from design and share-ability, to page speed and on-page SEO).
Things to note – in senior year I applied my scholarship to do my first year of my MBA in finance at my university. At 23 I bought an apartment complex which gives 10%+ ROI. At graduation in December I’m eyeing to be pulling 140k before my 24th bday. So that’s been my journey. To a high net worth ~130-140k + a ~ 140k income at 23. My issue is I’ll have a NW still around 140k at 24 (because I’m living it up this 1 semester woot woot and not saving much for 4 months). So I’m troubled figuring out how I can turn 140k + my high income to 1 million before 28 to keep pace with Sam. When school finishes I plan to buy more apartment complex’s continue to buy index funds, save over 95% still and get back to working on a project and finance site as I’ll have more free time with engineering school over finally. Still with that, I’m not sure how to make 860k in 4 years… thinking I’ll have to go to finance or consulting and pray for big bonuses to make it happen because otherwise I’m not sure how to keep up with Sam :) any ideas people?
Another thing I always want to cover is getting every possible question that a reader might have answered. Subtly, in one way or another, answering questions before they arise provide rationale for any reader who is ready to purchase. This also works great for SEO purposes since it covers the “lingo” for the product. Google evolves through constant self-learning, so once people start to ask questions on Q&A sites and forums, once they start to write about every single aspect of a product, it picks up. And fairly quickly. Just type something in the Google keyword tool and it shows you new and more synonyms by the day.
My grades were terrible in high school. I did better in college. I still graduated debt-free, and made very little money the first few years in business. With positive mental attitude and a game plan in place, I was able become debt-free by 35, and my income is very good for my age. Now that I’m debt-free, I’ve been able to save for retirement (what I should have done first).
This is interesting to me because I just accepted a medical sales job with a great company and there is a lot of opportunity, however I left a job I really miss (didn’t realize how much I liked it until I left). Although the income potential is high in med sales, I’m really not liking the lifestyle of being on the road all the time. I also moved to a new place for the job and don’t know anyone so that doesn’t help either. Is it better to stick it out and see if something changes or accept that I made a career mistake and try to get out asap? I guess I get torn between going after a good opportunity vs going back to a job with less potential but maybe something I’d enjoy more.
My prediction is that the next big thing will be Google using the referring page to pick up keywords instead of the anchor text. Anchor text is too easy to game. There are already people saying that they are getting better results when a referrer links straight to their home page with their site name instead of any keywords. The keywords are now in the referring post.

As you progress your mid-career 6-figure/+ salary, and full 401K contributions over the years, along other bonuses/stocks/investments you may have made/saved., you are on your path to that million and/or FI.. As you reach into late 30s, early 40s, see the financial picture: your 401K+investments growing about 7% average — on a typical 800K investments — that amount to $56K/year, your salary (don’t forget savings!), plus say 25K/year growth on your home-equity (in good town/school-district)., you will be closing “double” the six-figure income. Keep the progress going, cruise-control, and enjoy the ride along the way — you be on your way to FI soon. Do learn Golf, you know how to hob-nob with big boys (or girls)
Make sure you have some sort of money maker on your website before you start promoting it. You could promote an affiliate product related to your site's topic, or you could use Google Adsense. Your goal is to get your site to make the most money possible, so if you have lots of ways to make money on your site, then you will most likely make lots of money.
Great article, thanks. My question is slightly off the affiliate topic. I am curious about how Authorship will effect people running blogs on different topics.I run a marketing creative firm and want to start moving into information product sales, but I want to be able to write about our firm expertise (membership marketing) as well as try out products and blogging for people who want to start creative firms. How will people who want to write on unrelated areas manage things like G+ profiles as Aurthorship and authority become bigger deals? Do you think it will be a problem in Google to have the same author writing about different topics?

Thanks for sharing this information. I actually work as a Project Management consultant in the technology and healthcare industry but I really want to get into construction project management because I love architecture I was also interested in natural resources project management just for a change but, it is very difficult to switch from one industry to another any advice?
No wonder even after 8 years of trying soooo many programs I am still where I have been for all these years – a NEWBIE! Frankly I do not see Wealthy Affiliate to be my way out. I can see it is a non-specific info-overloaded, with steep learning curve to overcome. After all these years I have yet to find a specific ‘do this first then this’ step by step tried and tested program that I can confidently follow to earn some decent income. What a shame!
I agree a persons entry level career potential really does start in 9th grade as they try to rise to the top of their class. But as John mentioned in his article, after a few years your work performance and aptitude is the largest factor in determining future salary, not someone’s educational background. A degree gets you a job. Your experience and performance get you to be the high income earner though.
Penny – Great post and you have gone beyond what most teachers do to maximize income. Teachers are underpaid. My wife taught for 18 years and the most she ever made was $26000 (when she was single in Alabama), but she would never have traded the experience and sense of accomplishment she had as teaching in a low income school district and helping kids envision a better future.
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You really CAN make a living as a blogger — if you're willing to commit the time and effort, and if you follow the advice in this book. Written by two leading authorities on creating and monetizing blogs, ProBlogger lays out the steps you need to follow to create a revenue-generating blog. Complete with exercises to help you put the advice into practice, this book offers a realistic, approachable look at what it really takes to turn blogging into a successful career.
That was more words the I intended to tap out on my phone screen…probably because I’m hurtling through the dark in a bullet train somewhere between Tokyo and Aomori toward the tail end of 3 countries in three days on two sides of the Pacific Ocean (for fun, not work) and my time-warped brain dropped into story time. My wife just told me to eat my bento box meal. I’m getting old. :-)
I have to agree, when starting an affiliate site, you are putting up a huge investment, effort, money, and time, then if it is not bad enough, on top of that pit, earn less then 8% commission from you know who, and to insult you even more, give you a 24hr window, then you know who get a free sale from all your hard work when that person did not buy within 24hr, and to be honest, getting any site off the ground really blows, as you normally have to fight google all the way up the hill, which can take weeks, or even months just to find out if what you have done was a complete waste of effort, time, and money. As long as you got the money, and put up a quality site with quality content, then it may pay off in a few years, but how much money did one invest before getting into the black, all while the ceos are laughing at you for promoting them just to give you almost nothing in return for you hard work, and with a 24hr cookie.
Most of the information on this site is free for you to read, watch or listen to, but The Creative Penn is also a business and my livelihood. So please expect hyperlinks to be affiliate links in many cases, when I receive a small percentage of sales if you wish to purchase. I only recommend tools, books and services that I either use or people I know personally. Integrity and authenticity continue to be of the highest importance to me. Read the privacy policy here. Read the Cookie policy here. I hope you find the site useful! Thanks - Joanna
The very first affiliate program I reviewed, paid an average of ten percent commissions on each product sale my site generated. The products (mostly books) averaged around $15 so my share would be about a buck and a half per sale. I figured if I could get one sale out of every 35 visitors I sent to the site, that would be a decent conversion rate (better than average, actually). After doing a little math, I concluded that I would earn about $45 for every 1000 visitors I sent to the site.

In addition to physicians, lawyers, physicists, and nuclear engineers were all among the nation's 20 highest paid occupations with incomes in excess of $78,410.[24] Some of the other occupations in the high five-figure range were economists with a median of $72,780,[25] mathematicians with $81,240,[26] financial managers with $81,880,[27] and software publishers with median annual earnings of $73,060.[28] The median annual earnings of wage-and-salary pharmacists in May 2006 were $94,520. The median annual earnings of wage-and-salary engineers in November 2011 were $90,000. The middle 50 percent earned between $83,180 and $108,140 a year (as in the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2008–09 Edition by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics).
I do have to comment though on your section where you mention pursuing an MBA for a higher salary. This is risky. In order to attend one of those top universities full-time (because I’m fairly certain those universities don’t have part-time programs, and if so, part-time programs are not looked at with the same respect as full-time from recruiters), one must give up 21-24 months of employment (which, in my current situation is about $140-145K) as well as pay $120-140 for the program. That’s $280,000 in costs.

I love following your story and I appreciate how you are trying to teach your peers about money and maternity leaves, etc… You are an inspiration for your generation. You love your job and you are a role model but you also believe that we should all strive to be who we want to be and get paid for it. Keep swinging, Penny! You’re hitting home runs already!
Well, to be honest being patience and invest enough time and money is the key to get success in any online business and 7 Figure Franchise is not an exception. The problem is that first, it’s not worth $1997 at all because it only teaches you how to promote products of someone else and second, there is not any guarantee that you’ll get success if you follow training. Another negative points of 7 Figure Franchise is lack of support. If you stick on a level of training, nobody is there to help you out. You need to figure out everything by yourself which takes more of your valuable time.
So then I graduate… and my company offers to send me to any school in the country for my Master’s; pay my salary + the degree and then give me another raise when I graduate… So me being the person I am I applied to a bunch of top schools cause not like I was paying so another full ride (woot woot). So now I’m about to finish my Master’s this December at a top 10 program by the age of 23 and I expect my income and investments to net me probably 140k with a LOT of upward mobility. I live in a state much cheaper than cities like Houston/Dallas… so for sheer buying power I would say I am probably pulling 400k equivalent to someone in the Bay Area or NYC. So if you bust your ass you can crush it out there.

There are jobs out there for veterans and sometimes yes your training in the military does not give many, if any, civilian options. But I encourage you to think outside the box. You do not need to get any job that has to do with your rate. My cousin was aircraft ordnance and now is happy being a bartender in Hawaii. Not my cup of tea but it’s his life and he is happy with it. Look at USAjobs. com as another poster suggested. There are also jobs on nukeworker.com that don’t require nuclear experience like security. Keep trying, you may have to work some terrible jobs as I did, but you’ll find your way.
This article has been so inspiring to me! I’m a junior in high school and I’m so ready to get out of it and into the real world. They always say money can’t buy happiness, which I agree with to an extent. But I have my standards… I wanna live at the beach in a nice house. And I want to live comfortably. And I want to be able to take care of my family. And a little money would go a long way to helping that. So thank you for all of this wonderful advice!
Things to note – in senior year I applied my scholarship to do my first year of my MBA in finance at my university. At 23 I bought an apartment complex which gives 10%+ ROI. At graduation in December I’m eyeing to be pulling 140k before my 24th bday. So that’s been my journey. To a high net worth ~130-140k + a ~ 140k income at 23. My issue is I’ll have a NW still around 140k at 24 (because I’m living it up this 1 semester woot woot and not saving much for 4 months). So I’m troubled figuring out how I can turn 140k + my high income to 1 million before 28 to keep pace with Sam. When school finishes I plan to buy more apartment complex’s continue to buy index funds, save over 95% still and get back to working on a project and finance site as I’ll have more free time with engineering school over finally. Still with that, I’m not sure how to make 860k in 4 years… thinking I’ll have to go to finance or consulting and pray for big bonuses to make it happen because otherwise I’m not sure how to keep up with Sam :) any ideas people?
As is the case for most professional reviewers, many of the books I review on this site have been provided by the publisher or author, at no cost to me. I've also reviewed books that I bought, because they were worthy of your time. And I've also received dozens of review copies at no charge that do not get reviewed, either because they are not worthy or because they don't meet the subject criteria for this column, or simply because I haven't gotten around to them yet, since I only review one book per month. I have far more books in my office than I will ever read, and the receipt of a free book does not affect my review.
Not every site has to focus on emails. That being said, Ramsay has a good point. One of the reasons I wanted to ask about conversion rate is because you don’t know if people have objections. Usually this is the job of the product seller, but maybe they have questions about these specific products that aren’t being answered, which you could solve with an email list and regular updates.

I just want to point out that all though it is fantastic to go to college & to have great grades, innovative thinking & motivation can land you an awesome job. I graduated HS top of my class & went to a small private college for 2 years. I only have an AA degree (nothing to brag about though I always earned As). I decided to get married at 19 (I know, right?!) but when I was staying at home with the kids, I started my own real estate business & started making a 6 figure income within 3 years. I have doubled that within the past year & rake in over $300K per year working from home. I sell around 200 properties a year. I just hit 30 & make over $300K per year & started making 6 figures at only 28. I’m sitting pretty with a high paying job where I am in control of my own destiny. Work ethic & seeing an opportunity & knowing how to seize it is how I got there. With that said, I do value education & will likely go back to get a degree someday just so I can say I have one. For now though, I will focus on my $300K+ per year income & know that I made this for myself.
Before I share the strategies that I’ve used to generate over $100,000 in affiliate commissions per month at this point, there are two extremely important rules I use when promoting products that are not my own. You don’t have to use these rules in order to become an affiliate or be successful at it, but it’s what has helped me grow my affiliate income tremendously over the last couple of years:
Now you don’t need college credits to make school affordable. I went to a private school myself which I paid for all of except part of my first semester which my parents split until I had better jobs. By the time I finished I actually paid less than what my parents paid to put me through a private HS which at the time averaged $3,900/yr. I did it with scholarships and grants. I applied for everything I could. In total my 4yr degree cost me around $3,400/yr. You could add in maybe another 200/yr for books as I always kept a tight lid on that expense. I also worked hard as heck. At one point I even decided to take out a student loan to invest it in CD’s since the rate was much higher. Why? I wasn’t even concerned with paying it back since I had built up the money, and it’s not often you get a highly discounted lunch.
It seems that people are slightly repelled from sales pages since the experience imposes a decision making at a speed not of their choosing i.e. they are aware of the funnel and quite frankly suspicious of being manipulated (this is where trust building kicks in, but sometimes just…). For that reason, using editing techniques and somewhat less obvious copywriting techniques can make a huge difference. Give the full disclosure that you are selling, sure, but make it so that the reader is in a different mindset. I for one like to make the sale page looking like any other article on the site. Magazine style articles, with pictures, opinions, personal experience, advice… When my style of expression and writing feels as dispersed through the article as it is through any other segment of my site, I know that the page would appeal more to visitors.
You didn’t mention engineering as a industry. Engineers have some of the best starting salaries out of college and many of my business partners have MBAs. I graduated with a masters in structural engineering and then 6 years later got qualified as a diver with an ADCI commercial dive card. Then I was making 100,000+ annually. I now have my own firm and make 200,000+ at 32 years old.
You got a good article here but a lot of points are way off in real world sense. Any monkey that can read and regurgitate information can graduate with a high gpa. The real truth behind success is thinking outside the box. I’m 22 avg student yet run a successful business (100-120k/yr) while in college. With this article your saying go from box to box first your in an educational institution spending all your time and effort getting A’s then your working for someone in a corporate box. Let your bank account be your resume. The world needs more entrepreneurs
The latest annual inflation rate is 1.3 percent. It was 1.5 percent in 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That’s well below average, but gas, food prices, college tuition and the cost of health care have taken the biggest bites out of six-figure incomes. The latter two, plus the cost of housing, have risen faster than the rate of inflation over the past decade.
Use Deep Links – these are pages on your affiliate’s website that AREN’T the homepage. For SiteGround’s hosting I link a lot to their speed technology page as an affiliate link. If you’re doing Amazon’s affiliate program you just want to gather a list of products you will be recommending to readers, create an affiliate link for each one, and import them to the plugin.
Education. Your thirst for education should be constant and voracious. I don't care if you're reading this in your twenties or your sixties. There's always something new to learn that you can add to your well of knowledge to draw upon. So take that improv class you've been thinking about or buy that course you're interested in. It's always worth it if you learn just one thing from it.
Most of the information on this site is free for you to read, watch or listen to, but The Creative Penn is also a business and my livelihood. So please expect hyperlinks to be affiliate links in many cases, when I receive a small percentage of sales if you wish to purchase. I only recommend tools, books and services that I either use or people I know personally. Integrity and authenticity continue to be of the highest importance to me. Read the privacy policy here. Read the Cookie policy here. I hope you find the site useful! Thanks - Joanna

If there’s one thing that all freelancers know, it is that their income is always ‘unpredictable’. Sometimes, you have work that you can’t even handle and sometimes, you are in desperate need for work. Your earnings as a freelancer depends on your time. The more time you spend, the more you will earn. This is why having recurring revenue can prove to be a significant factor of financial growth.
Furthermore, symphony orchestras are non profit organization and cannot support itself without the donation from the public. We know this is a challenge. I explained in the above comment that top symphony musicians have been dedicating their whole life to this traditional art form and that is why they have to fight hard to keep our salary competitive (even mere 5%).
What's up ladies and dudes! Great to finally meet you, and I hope you enjoyed this post. My name is Nathaniell and I'm the owner of One More Cup of Coffee. I started my first online business in 2010 promoting computer software and now I help newbies start their own businesses. Sign up for my #1 recommended training course and learn how to start your business for FREE!